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Friday, July 22, 2005

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NetOx

The Sudan government is responsible for the deaths of approximately 300,000 people to date, and over 2 million have been driven from their homes.

In beautiful Geneva, the UN elected Sudan to be a member to its Commission for Human Rights. The US ambassador stormed out of the meeting, calling it an “absurdity.” (maybe Bolton isn’t enough of an A-Hole to deal with the UN).

What the UN needs is an overhaul of how it upholds rights and peace and a permanent professional peacekeeping force—full-time UN troops. This force must be able to respond quickly and effectively to any crisis that may occur (Maybe M. Moore will send his son or daughter). These should not be US or any countries troops, but volunteers from all over the world, specifically trained to apply therapy to the Janjaweed rapist types and if that doesn’t work remove their brains with an explosive bullet.

richard lo cicero

Edward Lutwack proposed such a force and added that any number of young men - and I suppose women as well - would be drawn to such an "International Legion" with its promise of adventure. But how it would be deployed would raise serious problems. The wingnuts here would go nuts about "World Government" and black helocopters! Certain Leftists woild rant about Capitalist hegemony! I like the idea but can't see the great powers, i.e. Perm. members of the Security Council, giving up control of such a force and if they could agree there would not have been a Rwanda or a Sudan.

So Andrea Mitchell is a hack. Tell me something else I don't know! Maybe the Newseum can open a new Hall of Martyrs for her and Judy Miller.

too many steves

At the risk of straying further off the topics of poor Andrea Mitchell's mistreatment, the US spooning with Sudan, and low wages for migrant workers, I would simply respond to the above ideas about the UN with this:

so long as the UN has no functional standards for membership - i.e.; everyone is allowed in - and gives voice and power to even the most despicable regimes (see the bit about Sudan the UN Commission on Human Rights above) then it will have no moral authority nor credibility to do any sort of "peacekeeping".

On topic (#3, wages/labor costs) I have questions borne of ignorance on my part: are migrant workers organized? can they not strike or something to get better treatment? is there such a great supply of people to do the work for $6.75/hour that the growers operate without fear of losing crops/money if they don't satisfy the people that do the crop picking? would the rest of us be so upset by the increase in cost of crops as a result of a work stoppage that the workers fear a backlash?

NetOx

"rewarded with the minimum wage of $6.75 per hour"
My biggest problem with the minimum wage workers at Gallo, Taco Bell or Beverly Hills maids is that their healthcare is thrust on (me) the taxpayer. It makes a lot more sense to pay the ACTUAL cost of the grapes at the supermarket.

I favor at federal requirement for all employers to pay into a "Personal Healthcare Account" for each employee. This requirement would be like un-employment insurance or taxes adding 1-2 dollars per hour to the cost of labor currently without coverage. This may not help the under the table workers, but one problem at a time.

Implementation of (Universal Affordable Healthcare / Republican Style):
1) All employers are REQUIRED to fund a personal healthcare account for all employees.
2) Part-time employees would be pro-rated (i.e. 20hrs/40hrs = 50% funded).
3) This personal healthcare account can only be used for group health insurance and related expenses.
4) All insurance companies are blind to each person’s age, health, gender etc. Instead compete by price and feature of plan.
5) All un-employment insurance must fund a personal healthcare account.
6) Individuals may fund or add to their personal healthcare account and purchase coverage from participating insurance providers at group rates.
7) Plans may only be switched in January.
8) Minimum based on cost of Congressional hearth care.

Mavis Beacon

"...during the Rwanda genocide, the Clinton administration figured it would take 85,000 African deaths to justify the death of one American soldier. Now we know that the Bush administration equates the manhandling of one hack reporter with the deaths of 200,000 (maybe we have finally discovered the real difference between Republicans and Democrats!)."

I could frame this quote!

Randy Paul

Regarding the UN and the UNHRC, the member nations of Africa elected Sudan, so perhaps the blame belongs there.

Kofi Annan has helped develop and backed a major overhaul of the UNHRC turning it into the Human Rights Council and improving the standards for measurement. The major HR NGO's have all endorsed it. How about some acknowledgment of that. Credit where credit is due.

too many steves

Ok, credit where credit is due. Kudos to Kofi Annan for successfully changing the name of the United Nations Human Rights Commission to the Human Rights Council. If and when that change produces some real world results then additional kudos will have been earned and deserved.

Randy Paul

It's a lot more substantial than that. Since you seem to be determined to sound off without digging into the issue, perhaps you might want to read this first:

http://hrw.org/english/docs/2005/04/12/global10469.htm

Unless, of course, you prefer to continue cursing the darkness.

Michael J. Totten

I will give credit to the UN Human Rights Commission when dictatorships are no longer allowed anywhere near it. I was hoping to find something to that effect at Randy's link, but I did not.

Of course the regional member nations deserve blame for choosing Sudan. But the UN also deserves blame for allowing the option.

The UNHRC is still useful, though. It shows us where the lowest common denominator is, for whatever that's worth.

In the meantime, I'll stick with Amnesty International (despite its recent hyperbolic outbursts) and Human Rights Watch. They don't need "reform" to keep genocidal mass murderers off the staff.

Randy Paul

Well, Michael, it's a start and the fact that all of the major human rights NGO's are supporting Annan's reforms.

Yet again Michael, you fail to dig a little deeper. This link http://hrw.org/un/letter033005.htm was on the same page as the previous one:

"We also welcome Secretary-General Annan’s emphasis on issues related to promoting democracy, establishing the rule of law, and strengthening links between governance and development. As his report notes, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Community of Democracies have 'contributed greatly to the eventual global acceptance of democracy as a universal value.'

"Consequently, we urge members of the Community of Democracies to support each other when seeking to be elected to the Council and to support among its members those with the strongest human rights records. It is essential that membership to the Council, as with the Democracy Caucus itself, be limited to those countries which meet the criteria for invitation as full participants to the Community of Democracies Ministerial meeting in Santiago, Chile."

One click and you could have found that out. Was that so hard?

too many steves

"Polite, meaningless words".

from here: http://www.ohchr.org/english/

"57th session of the Sub-Commission on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights, (Geneva, 25 July - 12 August 2005)

84th session of the Human Rights Committee (Geneva, 11-29 July 2005)

23rd session of the Working Group on Indigenous Populations (18-22 July 2005, Palais des Nations, Geneva)

2005 Social Forum - (21-22 July, Palais des Nations room XVII, Geneva)

The OHCHR Plan of Action: Protection and empowerment
Arabic | Chinese | English | French | Russian | Spanish"

Ah yes, endless meetings in posh hotels with sumptious foods, I'm sure.

They've even published an organization chart with flow arrows:

http://www.ohchr.org/english/structure.htm

Not to mention a mission statement:

http://www.ohchr.org/english/bodies/chr/index.htm

and don't miss this tidbit of news: "Summary of the open-ended informal consultations prepared by the Chairperson of the 61st session of the Commission on Human Rights pursuant to ECOSOC Decision 2005/217"

I would like it to work, I have great hope that it will some day, but as presently constituted, organized, and operated it is nothing more that a Monty-Python-esqe farce.

Jay Byrd

You'll find that very effective committees like, say, the committees that worked out the HDTV or USB standards also publish organization charts with flow arrows, mission statements, and stilted summaries blah blah blah pursuant to blah blah blah. None of that is any more indicative of anything than that the members all wear shoes.

Jim Rockford

The UN is a useless blather talk shop. Kofi Annan is as useless now as he was in Rwanda.

GWB is useless as well. However, the role of the opposition party is to hold the feet of the majority to the fire on issues of transcending national and international importance.

Too bad the Dems have painted themselves into a UN-must-approve, all US force unilaterally is bad, the military is evil posture.

A REAL opposition party with backbone would demand the US sort things out with a mighty military, then go the hell home. Including Darfur. Sudan is no friend of ours, and would be a positive step if the regime was just GONE. Of course the allies of the Dems, the sainted CIA, relies on and therefore protects Sudan. The CIA does not actually DO any spying itself. It outsources that to Sudan and Syria.

It's cheap (politically, no fallout), and risk-avoiding.

But Dems felt it was more important to be against Iraq (and yes, Afghanistan) than to go out and save people that we have the ability to save. So more useless talk. As useless I must point out as the useless talk with Saddam. See a pattern here?

Michael J. Totten

Randy,

Okay, that's better. Thanks for the additional link.

It's an improvement. "Urging" isn't good enough, but it's a step in the right direction. Noted.

Virgil Johnson

I get so tired of the mental blackout in some of these posts and response to the posts - it is like an aggrevated AA meeting, with no one getting beyond the first step, taking responsibility!

Pardon me, I didn't know our complicity with Sudan regarding oil, and making room for the pipelines by killing thousands of people is not supposed to be known! I know it's just not Bush, but the entire world that has this lust for oil - so I do not totally blame this administration.

I mean, right on the places where the people were cleared out oil is being pumped. This was the job of the Janjaweed - to clear the area for oil extraction, or didn't you know this?

However, these oil revenues will not translate into anything for the regional people - they will be dispossessed of their land and wantonly killed. Bush bellows on about genocide but does little to nothing to stop this disaster - because he smells oil, whether it is his or that of his willing western allies - or the crown jewel of China, etc.

The war against terrorism once again reduces to oil, as our president dutifully nods toward the genocide but does nothing. Get the facts straight, the only reason Bush's little pinky lifts for human rights in this instance is the outcry of American people with conscience - but his motions mean precious little but temporary placation.

Abbas-Ali Abadani

Yo, Virgil

Got a link to corroborate the claim about oil and Darfur? I remember reading something about this a while ago but didn't put much stock into it since the source was kinda iffy.

But if you've got a decent source to back up this claim, I wouldn't mind checking it out.

Personally I don't think that oil is what *all* or even most of the various conflicts in Sudan are all about. I think they're about what all wars in that region have always been about -- tribal warfare over land and resources. Yes, "resources" does include oil, especially in the south and most especially in Bahr el-Ghazal province -- which is where Sudan's major oil fields lie. But I honestly am not aware of major oil deposits in the west, although I would love to examine for myself any data that showed otherwise.

There was a great article written about Sudan in the New York Press last year. Let me try to find it. Okay, here it is.


ONE HELLHOLE UNDER GOD
Why the Republican Party suddenly cares about Sudan — or at least pretends to.

http://www.nypress.com/17/30/news&columns/ChristopherLord.cfm

The author takes a pro-intervention position and yet also deconstructs a lot of the popular mythology that has been built up around Sudan. Good stuff.

There's also an outstanding piece by William Lind on Fourth Generation war in Sudan available at all of the following links.

http://antiwar.com/lind/?articleid=3038

http://www.d-n-i.net/lind/lind_7_15_04.htm

http://www.lewrockwell.com/lind/lind31.html

http://www.military.com/NewContent/0,13190,Lind_071504,00.html

I say outstanding despite the fact that he also resorts to use of the false "Arabs vs. blacks" meme that has gained so much currency.

Some excerpts:

"...we take a journey through war over the last 5,000 years. It begins with a modern overlay, in the form of bombing by aircraft. Terrorizing tribesmen by bombing their villages from the air was a technique pioneered by the British in their post-World War I fight with insurgents in Iraq. It has the advantage that tribesmen seldom have much in the way of air defenses, other than to get up and move. In the Sudan, that seems to be just what their enemies desire.

"Of course, the involvement of aircraft suggests the involvement of the Sudanese government. But the rest of the Plain Dealer's brief account quickly moves us beyond, or more precisely, back from the age of the state.

"Those gun (muzzleloaders? flintlocks?) and sword-wielding militiamen are almost certainly tribesmen. Not only are their horse and camel-charges something out of past centuries, so is their primary loyalty. It is safe to say that their ties to the government of the Sudan are tenuous. They are fighting for their tribes against other tribes they have fought for generations. As the state recedes, it reveals once again the old human landscape, almost unaltered and ready, like winter wheat under the snow, to spring to life again and flourish."

Jay Byrd

It seems that there may be an Andrea Mitchell connection to LeakGate. I found this posted as a comment on David Corn's blog in response to his piece about the devastating testimony given by former CIA case officer and former prosecutor James Marcinkowski before the Dem "unofficial" committee.
Anyway, as to that Andrea Mitchell connection, see item 6.

Waxman: 11 Security Breaches in Plame Case
Author: Rep. Henry Waxman
Published on July 22, 2005, 14:25

The disclosure of the covert identity of Valerie Plame Wilson in a July 14, 2003, column by Robert Novak has triggered a criminal investigation and led to calls for congressional investigations. The Novak column, however, appears to be only one of multiple leaks of Ms. Wilson's identity. A new fact sheet released today by Rep. Waxman documents that there appear to be at least 11 separate instances in which Administration officials disclosed information about Ms. Wilson's identity and association with the CIA.

New Fact Sheet Details Multiple Administration Security Breaches Involving Valerie Plame Wilson

On July 14, 2003, columnist Robert Novak revealed that the wife of Ambassador Joseph Wilson, Valerie Plame Wilson, was a covert CIA agent. This disclosure of classified information has triggered a criminal investigation by a Special Counsel and led to calls for congressional investigations.

The Novak column, however, appears to be only one of multiple leaks of Ms. Wilson's identity. As this fact sheet documents, there appear to be at least 11 separate instances in which Administration officials disclosed information about Ms. Wilson's identity and association with the CIA.

Under Executive Order 12958, the White House is required to investigate any reports of security breaches and take "prompt corrective action," such as suspending the security clearances of those involved. Unlike prosecutions for criminal violations, which require "knowing" and "intentional" disclosures, the executive order covers a wider range of unauthorized breaches, including the "negligent" release of classified information. There is no evidence that the White House has complied with its obligation to investigate any of the 11 reported instances of security breaches relating to Ms. Wilson or to apply administrative sanctions to those involved.

The Disclosures of Valerie Wilson's Identity

1. The Disclosure by Karl Rove to Columnist Robert Novak
In a column dated July 14, 2003, Robert Novak first reported that Valerie Plame Wilson was "an agency operative on weapons of mass destruction."1 Mr. Novak cited "two senior administration officials" as his sources.2 According to multiple news reports, one of these two sources was Karl Rove, the Deputy White House Chief of Staff and the President's top political advisor.3 During a phone call on July 8, 2003, Mr. Rove confirmed for Mr. Novak that Ms. Wilson worked at the CIA. During this conversation, Mr. Novak referred to Ms. Wilson "by her maiden name, Valerie Plame," and said he had heard she was involved in "the circumstances in which her husband � traveled to Africa."4 Mr. Rove responded, "I heard that, too."5 Mr. Novak's name also appeared "on a White House call log as having telephoned Mr. Rove in the week before the publication of the July 2003 column."6

2. The Disclosure by a "Senior Administration Official" to Columnist Robert Novak
In addition to his communications with Mr. Rove, Mr. Novak learned about Ms. Wilson's identity through communications with a second "senior administration official."7 Mr. Novak's second source has not yet been publicly identified. Mr. Novak has stated, however, that the source provided him with Ms. Wilson's identity. As he stated: "I didn't dig it out, it was given to me."8 He added: "They thought it was significant, they gave me the name and I used it."9

3. The Disclosure by Karl Rove to TIME Reporter Matt Cooper
During a phone call on July 11, 2003, Mr. Rove revealed to TIME reporter Matt Cooper that Ms. Wilson worked at the CIA on weapons of mass destruction.10 Mr. Cooper reported that this "was the first time I had heard anything about Wilson's wife."11 Mr. Rove provided this information on "deep background," said that "things would be declassified soon," and stated, "I've already said too much."12

4. The Disclosure by Scooter Libby to TIME Reporter Matt Cooper
During a phone call on July 12, 2003, TIME reporter Matt Cooper asked the Vice President's chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby "if he had heard anything about Wilson's wife sending her husband to Niger." 13 Mr. Libby replied, "Yeah, I've heard that too," or words to that effect.14 Mr. Libby provided this information "on background."15

5. The Disclosure by an "Administration Official" to Washington Post Reporter Walter Pincus
On July 12, 2003, an "administration official" told Washington Post reporter Walter Pincus that "Wilson's trip to Niger was set up as a boondoggle by his CIA-employed wife."16 Mr. Pincus has not publicly identified his source, but has stated that it "was not Libby."17

6. The Disclosure by a "Top White House Official" to an Unidentified Reporter
In addition making disclosures to Mr. Novak, Mr. Cooper, and Mr. Pincus, White House officials may have had conversations about Ms. Wilson with three other reporters about Ms. Wilson's identity. According to the Washington Post, a "senior administration official" confirmed that "before Novak's column ran on July 14, 2003, two top White House officials called at least six Washington journalists and disclosed the identity and occupation of Wilson's wife."18 According to this official, "Clearly, it was meant purely and simply for revenge."19 Press reports suggest that one of these unidentified reporters may be NBC correspondent Andrea Mitchell.20

7. The Disclosure by a "Top White House Official" to an Unidentified Reporter
In addition making disclosures to Mr. Novak, Mr. Cooper, and Mr. Pincus, White House officials may have had conversations about Ms. Wilson with three other reporters about Ms. Wilson's identity. According to the Washington Post, a "senior administration official" confirmed that "before Novak's column ran on July 14, 2003, two top White House officials called at least six Washington journalists and disclosed the identity and occupation of Wilson's wife."21 According to this official, "Clearly, it was meant purely and simply for revenge."22 Press reports suggest that one of these unidentified reporters may be NBC Meet the Press host Tim Russert.23

8. The Disclosure by a "Top White House Official" to an Unidentified Reporter
In addition making disclosures to Mr. Novak, Mr. Cooper, and Mr. Pincus, White House officials may have had conversations about Ms. Wilson with three other reporters about Ms. Wilson's identity. According to the Washington Post, a "senior administration official" confirmed that "before Novak's column ran on July 14, 2003, two top White House officials called at least six Washington journalists and disclosed the identity and occupation of Wilson's wife."24 According to this official, "Clearly, it was meant purely and simply for revenge."25 Press reports suggest that one of these unidentified reporters may be MSNBC Hardball host Chris Matthews.26

9. The Disclosure by an Unidentified Source to Wall Street Journal Reporter David Cloud
On October 17, 2003, Wall Street Journal reporter David Cloud reported that an internal State Department memo prepared by U.S. intelligence personnel "details a meeting in early 2002 where CIA officer Valerie Plame and other intelligence officials gathered to brainstorm about how to verify reports that Iraq had sought uranium yellowcake from Niger."27 This "classified" document had "limited circulation," according to "two people familiar with the memo."28

10. The Disclosure by an Unidentified Source to James Guckert of Talon News
On October 28, 2003, Talon News posted on its website an interview with Ambassador Joseph Wilson in which the questioner asked: "An internal government memo prepared by U.S. intelligence personnel details a meeting in early 2002 where your wife, a member of the agency or clandestine service working on Iraqi weapons issues, suggested that you could be sent to investigate the reports. Do you dispute that?"29 Talon News is tied to a group called GOP USA30 and is operated by Texas Republican Robert Eberle.31 Its only reporter, James Guckert (also known as Jeff Gannon), resigned when it was revealed that he gained access to the White House using a false name after his press credentials were rejected by House and Senate press galleries.32 In a March 2004 interview with his own news service, Mr. Guckert stated that the classified document was "easily accessible."33 In a February 11, 2005, interview with Wolf Blitzer of CNN, Mr. Guckert said the FBI interviewed him about "how I knew or received a copy of a confidential CIA memo," but he refused to answer FBI questions because of his status as a "journalist."34 A week later, Mr. Guckert changed his account, claiming he "was given no special information by the White House or by anybody else."35

11. The Disclosure by a "Senior Administration Official" to Washington Post Reporters Mike Allen and Dana Milbank
On December 26, 2003, Washington Post reporters Mike Allen and Dana Milbank reported on details about the classified State Department memo, writing that it was authored by "a State Department official who works for its Bureau of Intelligence and Research."36 The Post story was attributed to "a senior administration official who has seen" the memo.37 The Post also reported that the CIA was "angry about the circulation of a still-classified document to conservative news outlets" and that the CIA "believes that people in the administration continue to release classified information to damage the figures at the center of the controversy, former ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV and his wife, Valerie Plame."38


NOTES
1 Robert Novak, The Mission to Niger, Chicago Sun-Times (July 14, 2003).
2 Id.
3 Rove Reportedly Held Phone Talk on CIA Officer, New York Times (July 15, 2005). See also Rove Confirmed Plame Indirectly, Lawyer Says, Washington Post (July 15, 2005).
4 Id.
5 Id.
6 Rove Confirmed Plame Indirectly, Lawyer Says, Washington Post (July 15, 2005).
7 Robert Novak, The Mission to Niger, Chicago Sun-Times (July 14, 2003).
8 Columnist Blows CIA Agent's Cover, Newsday (July 22, 2003).
9 Id.
10 Matt Cooper, What I Told the Grand Jury, TIME (July 25, 2005).
11 Id.
12 Id.
13 Id.
14 Id.
15 Id.
16 The When and How of Leak Being Probed, Washington Post (Nov. 26, 2004).
17 Id.
18 Bush Administration Is Focus of Inquiry; CIA Agent's Identity Was Leaked to Media, Washington Post (Sept. 28, 2003).
19 Id.
20 Secrets and Leaks, Newsweek (Oct. 13, 2003) (stating that she "heard in the White House that people were touting the Novak column and that that was the real story").
21 Bush Administration Is Focus of Inquiry; CIA Agent's Identity Was Leaked to Media, Washington Post (Sept. 28, 2003).
22 Id.
23 Reporter Held in Contempt in CIA Leak Case, Washington Post (Aug. 10, 2004) (describing a July 2003 telephone conversation between Mr. Russert and Mr. Libby).
24 Bush Administration Is Focus of Inquiry; CIA Agent's Identity Was Leaked to Media, Washington Post (Sept. 28, 2003).
25 Id.
26 Secrets and Leaks, Newsweek (Oct. 13, 2003) (reportedly stating to Mr. Wilson, "I just got off the phone with Karl Rove, who said your wife was fair game").
27 Memo May Aid Leak Probe, Wall Street Journal (Oct. 17, 2003).
28 Id.
29 Leaks Probe Is Gathering Momentum, Washington Post (Dec. 26, 2003). See also Senate Intel Report Discredits Wilson's Claims About Iraq, Niger, Talon News (July 13, 2004) (confirming that Talon reported on the memo in October 2003).
30 Leaks Probe Is Gathering Momentum, Washington Post (Dec. 26, 2003).
31 Democrats Want Investigation of Reporter Using Fake Name, New York Times (Feb. 11, 2005).
32 Id.
33 Id.
34 Rumsfeld Visits Iraq, CNN (Feb. 11, 2005).
35 Anderson Cooper 360, CNN (Feb. 18, 2005). See also Web Site Owner Says He Knew of Reporter's 2 Identities, New York Times (Feb. 20, 2005) (claiming that referring to the memo as though he had it was "merely an interview technique").
36 Leaks Probe Is Gathering Momentum, Washington Post (Dec. 26, 2003).
37 Id.
38 Id.

Virgil Johnson

There are ton's of sources regarding the tragedy in Darfur related to oil, here is one concise source:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sudan/story/0,14658,1503470,00.html#article_continue

Dee Lite

Well done, Sudan! It was about time someone brought up short one of these heavy-weight American media mediocrities who can barely find the countries they visit on a world map.

Trey Stone

i'm sorry i happened to skim through this particular rant.

Virgil Johnson

This second post should be read as the primer to the above Guardian Article, regarding oil in West Darfur region. There are now oil derricks all over the property of the people driven out in the western region. This administration will do nothing to offend the ruling class in Sudan - it sends Rice to tell them that it makes them "look bad," advice from the the administration which has one of the worse images in the world today:

http://www.sudantribune.com/article.php3?id_article=10720

Virgil Johnson

And again, geological surveys show abundant oil in Darfur, confirmed by Sudan's Energy and Mining Minister Awad Ahmed al-Jazz:

http://www.adnkj.com/index_2level.php?cat=Business&loid=8.0.153757146&par=0

Virgil Johnson

here is a post from 2004 that names the reason for the genocide in Darfur, Zaman Daily News:

http://www.zaman.com/?bl=international&alt=&trh=20040706&hn=10130

Virgil Johnson

Here is what I deduce regarding the Darfur genocide. There are classic and long lasting animosity between the the Muslim Arab population and the residents of Darfur. There is also a kindred dislike because of the rebel like groups that have formed in Darfur, with the official Sudanese government.

In 2003 you have Eronat buying the resource rights to this region, and than suddenly you have the apperance of the Janjaweed - I find this to be more than a mere coincidence. Suddenly you have this organized, concerted effort to drive the people off the land. The Sudanese government has provided material support for the Janjaweed, which shows complicity.

All of these activities of cleansing and driving people off the land take off right after the purchase of the resourse rights. This is a bit obvious to me, perhaps someone else can come up with a better explanation - in light of this "sudden" appearance of oil derricks on the forcefully evacuated land? I doubt it. The complexity of the strained relationships in the region are just the cover for black gold fever.

Virgil Johnson

Correct post confirming oil in Darfur by Awad Ahmed al-Jazz Energy and Mining Minister of Sudan:

http://www.adnki.com/index_2Level.php?cat=business&loid=8.0.153757146&par=0

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